Copyright Infringement Dispute

 

Plaintiff: Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation (US) (Hereinafter referred to as “Fox”)

Defendant: Beijing Sohu Internet Information Service Co., Ltd. (Hereinafter referred to as “Sohu”)

 

Trial Court: Beijing No.1 Intermediate People’s Court. ((2006)Yi Zhong Min Chu Zi No. 11927)

 

FACTS AND COURT DECISIONS

 

1. Facts

The plaintiff, Fox, filed a complaint with the trial court, claiming that Fox was the copyright owner of the works of film, Cheaper by the Dozen and The Day After Tomorrow.  The defendant was the owner of the website www.sohu.com.  In October 2004, the plaintiff found that the defendant provided its network subscribers the services of on-line watching and downloading of more than a hundred of American films, including the plaintiff’s aforesaid films, on the website [www.sohu.som] without the permission of the plaintiff; in return, the defendant charged its network subscribers monthly fees.  According to Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works (hereinafter referred to as “Berne Convention”) and the Copyright Law of the People’s Republic of China, the copyright of the said works that was entitled to by the plaintiff should be protected under the Chinese law.  The defendant’s act of communicating the plaintiff’s works of films to public through information network, for the purpose of making profits but without the plaintiff’s permission, had constituted infringement of the plaintiff’s copyright and had caused great economic losses to the plaintiff.   So the plaintiff requested the trial court to order the defendant to (1) cease the infringing act against the plaintiff’s copyright, (2) publish a declaration of apology on the notable place of the homepage of the website www.sohu.com as well as in China Daily so as to make public apology to the plaintiff and eliminate the adverse effects, and (3) pay RMB 1,000,000 yuan to compensate the plaintiff for its economic losses and RMB 201,000 yuan for theits reasonable costs the plaintiff had paid for preventing the infringement.

The defendant, Sohu, argued that: (1) the plaintiff failed to provide legitimate and valid evidence proving that it was the right owner of the involved films; (2) the defendant had attained the right of communication via information on networks by means of legitimate authorization. The defendant had conducted necessary examination of the copyright of the involved films, so it had sufficiently fulfilled the duty of care and should not be burdened with liabilities for infringement; and (3) the defendant had obtained the authorization from the party irrelevant to the case, Beijing Golden Interactive Technology Development Co., Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as “Golden Interactive”) concerning the right of the involved films.  Even if Golden Interactive had not been granted legitimate authorization by the plaintiff, the request of the plaintiff to order the defendant to undertake legal liabilities including ceasing infringement, making apology and compensating damages was groundless.  Therefore, the defendant requested the trial court to reject all the claims filed by the plaintiff.

With respect to evidence, the parties to this case submitted three groups of evidence as follows:

(1) Evidence concerning ownership

During the trial, Fox submitted the following evidence in order to prove its ownership of the films Cheaper by the Dozen and The Day After Tomorrow.

a. The Confirmation of Copyright and its attachment regarding the two works of films issued by the Beijing Representative Office of The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) on June 20, 2006.  The attachment was a document issued by National Copyright Administration of the People’s Republic of China, filed under “GUO QUAN No. (2001) 21” and titled “Letter on Approval of the Establishment of Representative Office by MPAA in Beijing,” alone with the Notary Certificate (2006) Hu Huang Yi Zheng jing No. 5415, issued by No.1 Notary Public Office of Huangpu District, Shanghai on July 5, 2006, which confirmed the authenticity of the legal seal of Beijing Representative Office of MPAA and the signature of its chief representative Roland Mark Day.

b. A declaration issued by Beijing Representative Office of MPAA issues  on July 19, 2006, regarding the authenticity of the DVD discs of the two films and the verification that the copyright owner of the two said films was Fox; alone with  the Notary Certificate (2006) Hu Huang Yi Zheng ing No. 5798, issued by No.1 Notary Public Office of Huangpu District Shanghai on July 26, 2006, which verified the authenticity of the legal seal of Beijing Representative Office of MPAA and the signature of its chief representative Roland Mark Day. 

c. The duplication of the registration certificate of representative office of foreign enterprises, issued by State Administration for Industry and Commerce of the People’s Republic of China (hereinafter referred to as “SAIC”), and that of the working card of representative office of foreign enterprises, with the seal of the Bureau for the Registration of Foreign Investment Enterprise of SAIC; alone with  a notary certificate issued by the notary, Jiang Zhuo, verifying that the aforesaid duplications of the registration certificate and the working card were consistent with the original copy.

During the hearing, the defendant had no opposition to the authenticity of the aforesaid evidence, but argued that the certificate concerning the right of the involved works of films should be issued by MPAA.   However, the plaintiff did not present the said certificate. 

(2) Evidence concerning the infringing act

In order to demonstrate that the defendant had conducted the acts of infringing upon its right of communication via information networks concerning the said two works of films, Fox submitted the following evidence to the trial court within the time limit for presenting evidence: 

a. The notary certificate (2004) Hu Huang Yi Zheng jing No. 9937, issued by No.1 Notary Public Office of Huangpu District Shanghai on November 1, 2004.

b. T he notary certificate (2004) Hu Huang Yi Zheng jing No. 9938, issued by No.1 Notary Public Office of Huangpu District Shanghai on November 1, 2004.

In order to prove that it had gained the right of communication via information networks on the website of www.sohu.com concerning the two involved works of films, and that it had conducted necessary examination of Golden Interactive’s right of communication via information networks concerning the involved films owned so that it had sufficiently fulfilled the duty of care, the defendant submitted the following evidence within the time limit for presenting evidence: 

The Cooperation Agreement Regarding the Communication of Entertaining Audiovisual Content on Internet and the supplementary agreement concluded by the defendant and Golden Interactive on July 16, 2003 and April 1, 2005 respectively, providing that the defendant was responsible for providing complete broadband network resources for purpose of the cooperation between both sides on developing audiovisual value-added business, and for guaranteeing the legitimate right of business operation concerning the network resources the defendant provided, while Golden Interactive should guarantee the legitimate copyright of the audiovisual programs it provided; the defendant was responsible for incorporating the resources of audiovisual programs provided by Golden Interactive into the defendant’s network system for the use of the latter’s subscribers.

b. The letter of authorization that authorizes Golden Interactive to use the films Cheaper by the Dozen and The Day After Tomorrow. The letter of authorization was merely in a Chinese version, without original copy, and had never been notarized or certificated.

3. The list of Golden Interactive’s authorized programs, including Cheaper by the Dozen and The Day After Tomorrow, indicating the duration of authorization for each of these programs was from July 16, 2003 to July 16, 2005.

It was found by the trial court that the column of “broadband” had been cancelled. on Sohu’s website, where the column regarding films then was the column of “entertainment”.

 (3) Evidence concerning compensations

This part include: the plaintiff’s evidence for claiming RMB 1,000,000 yuan of compensation based on the potential of huge box office revenue of the involved films, their significant influence as well as the defendant’s obvious subjective fault; the plaintiff’s evidence for proving RMB 201000 yuan of reasonable expense on litigation; and, the defendant’s evidence for proving that the revenues earned from the involved films were rather limited.

 

2. Trial Decision

It was held by the trial court that:

I. Whether the plaintiff was the copyright owner of Cheaper by the Dozen and The Day After Tomorrow

According to Article 2 of the Copyright Law of the People’s Republic of China, any work of a foreigner or stateless person which is eligible to enjoy copyright under an agreement concluded between the country to which the foreigner belongs or in which he has habitual residence and China, or under an internationa1 treaty to which both countries are party, shall be protected in accordance with this Law, and, works of foreigners or stateless persons first published in the territory of the People's Republic of China shall enjoy copyright in accordance with this Law.  Both China and USA were state members to the Berne Convention, the latter provided that the expression “literary and artistic works” shall cover cinematographic works and assimilated works as expressed by a process analogous to cinematography.  The protection under this Convention shall be granted to authors who are nationals of one of the countries of the Union, for their works, whether published or not.  Authors shall enjoy, in respect of works for which they are protected under this Convention, in countries of the Union other than the country of origin, the rights which their respective laws do now or may hereafter grant to their nationals, as well as the rights specially granted by this Convention.

MPAA was an organization approved by China for certifying the copyright of the works of films of its members. The Beijing Representative Office of MPAA was the latter’s assigned organ, whose establishment was under the approval of National Copyright Administration and SAIC and deemed legitimate, and whose scope of business operation covered the certification of the products of US films and visual works.  Mark Day was the chief representative of the Beijing Representative Office of MPAA. Therefore, the Confirmation of Copyright issued by the Beijing Representative Office of MPAA and the Declaration signed by Mark Day in person were sufficient to prove that the plaintiff was the copyright owner of the two involved films Cheaper by the Dozen and The Day After Tomorrow.  So in absence of counter evidence presented by the defendant, it should be ascertained that the copyright owner of the two works of films, Cheaper by the Dozen and The Day After Tomorrow, was the plaintiff.  According to the Chinese copyright law and Berne Convention, the plaintiff should be entitled to all moral rights and property rights under Article 10 of the Copyright Law of the People’s Republic of China, and the involved works of films should be protected under the Chinese copyright law.

 

II. Whether the defendant had infringed upon the plaintiff’s right of communication via information networks

In the light of Article 10 (1) (l) of the Copyright Law of the People’s Republic of China, the right of communication via information networks referred to the right of making available to the public a work by wire or wireless means in such a way that members of the public may access that work in a particular place and at a particular time as they individually choose.  Taking into account the facts of this case, the content of Notary Certificates No. 9937 and No. 9938 proved that the defendant had provided the service of downloading the two involved films on its operated website www.sohu.com, only half years after the initial publication of the two films in China. The defendant did not deny this.  Although the defendant had presented the agreement and related supplementary agreement it entered into with Golden Interactive, it was, in concluding the aforesaid agreement with the latter, obliged to check whether Golden Interactive was entitled to the right of communication via information networks concerning the two involved films, in order to ensure legitimate and valid authorization of the rights concerned.  As for the Chinese version of the Letter of Authorization, issued by Golden Interactive to the defendant and presented to the court by the latter, it was the evidence obtained outside the territory of China and had not been notarized or certificated.  Moreover, there were no corresponding original copies.   So such evidence was not deemed acceptable by the trial court.  Thus, the defendant’s argument that it had been legally authorized to download the two films was in lack of factual grounds and could not be accepted by the court. Accordingly, the defendant’s provision of the service of downloading the two involved films on its website without the plaintiff’s permission constituted infringement of the plaintiff’s right of communication via information networks.

 

III. The legal liabilities the defendant should be burdened with

Since the defendant had infringed upon the plaintiff’s right of communication via information networks, according to Article 47 and Article 48 of the Copyright Law of the People’s Republic of China, the defendant should bear civil liabilities including ceasing infringement, elimination of adverse effects and compensation of the damages, with the amount of compensation extending to the reasonable costs the right owner had paid for preventing infringement. 

Since what had been infringed upon by the defendant was the plaintiff’s right of communication via information networks regarding its works of films, which was the property right under the copyright regime and did not carry moral nature, the plaintiff ‘s request for the court to order the defendant to make public apology should not be supported. But the plaintiff’s request for elimination of adverse effect was of legal ground and should be supported.  With regard to the extent to which the adverse effect could be eliminated, given that the downloading service provided by the defendant was in the column of “broadband”, the plaintiff’s request that the defendant publish a declaration on the notable position of the homepage of its website as well as in China Daily was rather improper.  Considering that the column of “broadband” had been cancelled and what involved the film at issue was the column of “entertainment”, the defendant should publish the above-noted declaration on eliminating the adverse effect in the said column.

With regard to the calculation of amount of compensation, (1) the evidence submitted by both parties is analyzed as follows: in lack of statistical support, the report from the website called “DVD incomplete brochure” was incapable of reflecting the influence and box office of the two involved films objectively and accurately, and therefore could not be taken as a ground for the plaintiff’s claiming for compensation; Notary Certificate No. 8801 was the evidence preserved by the defendant  for its own server, which could not exclude the possibility that the defendant make alterations by  itself, and thus led to  a rather light weight of proof; since it could not be proven that Golden Interactive had obtained legitimated authorization from the plaintiff, the invoice presented by the defendant concerning its payment to Golden Interactive was irrelevant to this case and was not admissible.  (2) Since the plaintiff failed to provide a reasonable method of calculating the amount of compensation, the court would determine the amount of compensation at its discretion within the limit of quota amount of compensation, by taking into account such factors as the influence of the films concerned, the period of screening, the scale of the defendant’s website, the duration, territorial range of the defendant’s infringing acts as well as its subjective fault , and would not support the fulll amount of the compensation as the plaintiff had claimed for. (3) The Notary Certificates No. 9937 and No. 9938 presented the notarization requested by the plaintiff for evidence preservation, and the notary fees incurred thereby should be deemed reasonable fees.  The plaintiff’s claiming RMB 1,000 yuan for notary fees based on the ratio of the number of the involved films to the number of films indicated in the Notary Certificates was sound and should be supported.  The attorney fees the plaintiff had claimed for was too high and the court would support the reasonable part of it.

In conclusion, the defendant’s act of providing the service of downloading involved works of films to its network subscribers on its website www.sohu.som appeared to have constituted infringement of the plaintiff’s right of communication via information networks.  In light of Article 2, Article 10 (1) (l), Article 47(1) and Article 48 of the Copyright Law of the People’s Republic of China, as well as Article 25(1) and (2) and Article 26 of Several Provisions of the Supreme People’s Court on Issues Related to the Application of Law in the Adjudication of Copyright Disputes, the court ruled that: (1) the defendant Sohu should immediately cease infringing upon Fox’s right of communication via information networks as of the date of the effectiveness of the court decision; (2) the defendant Sohu should, within 10 days after the court decision became in effective, publish a declaration on the homepage of the column of “entertainment” for three consecutive days in order to eliminate the adverse effect caused by the infringement; the content of that declaration should be examined and approved by the court; if the defendant refused to so implement as such, the court would publish the main content of its decision, and the publication fees should be borne by the defendant; (3) the defendant Sohu should compensate the plaintiff for its economic losses in amount of RMB 261,000 yuan (including its reasonable costs for preventing the infringement); and (4) other claims filed by Fox should be rejected.

 

After the trial, neither party filed an appeal so the trial decision became in effective. 

 




 



Bonneterie Cevenole S.A.R.L. v. Shanghai Meizheng Fashion Co., Ltd et al.
On Intellectual Property Protection of Olympic Symbol

Previous: 

Next:

Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation v. Beijing Sohu Internet Information Service Co., Ltd.

BACK
本网站由阿里云提供云计算及安全服务 Powered by CloudDream